Mickisha Goss

Mickisha Goss

3 Comments

  1. Mickisha Goss is a horrible field supervisor. She made me teach a lesson to an eighth grade class and I have a common branch license and gave me a U rating.

    • I believe it. She is a horrific supervisor. I had the displeasure if working under her. She is very condescending and seems to lack the knowledge of pedagogy for which she has been charged to evaluate others. By that I mean she can spew it but I never witnessed her modeling what she meant. Gross abuse of power and authority. Despicable person.

  2. Old and in the way.

    Dr. Goss is all business; she has a honed, polished persona that she uses for intimidation to great effect. She has only one agenda — to terminate ATRs whenever and wherever possible.

    I earned an S rating from her because I prepared very carefully and my lesson plan successfully anticipated all the areas where she might have faulted me (student engagement, attendance, student lateness, appropriate pedagogy, etc.)

    Make sure in executing your observation lesson you challenge each and every student to engage with the material. If you actively manage your class — including any necessary disciplinary actions — you should be okay.

    That being said, be afraid. Be very afraid. Dr. Goss is a powerful, professional, intimidating figure.

    Despite her agenda there are ways to succeed. I found her evaluation was fair in her observation report. Although I got the sense that she HATED giving me a satisfactory rating. During our post-ob conference, she refused to say with it was an S or a U. “I won’t know until I write my report,” which suggested to me that even after she observed me she was going to use her notes to try to find a way to negate me. However, this was not my first time being evaluated by a hostile supervisor.

    Unfortunately, in practice you have to be perfect or plus perfect to achieve a basic satisfactory rating from her. While these extreme standards, or out of license evaluations may not hold up under arbitration, the process of fighting for your position is exhausting and stressful, by design.

    However, if you know what you’re doing professionally based on talent, skill and experience, you should be able to survive.

    Note to all — be very careful to not give ammunition to the ATR supervisors, i.e. have excellent attendance and eschew lateness. Always have a lesson plan for the occasional unscheduled, drive by appearance. Always make sure your class is on-task with a legitimate and defensible education inquiry.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.